Ford 4.6L Reference Guide

There are few engines we like more than the Ford Modulars. With all  of its configurations and options, the 4.6L can be found in many of the  Ford vehicles on the road today.

We took some time and searched the web for more information on these great engines. Our search took us to an eHow article written by Richard Rowe and wikipedia. Here is some of what we learned:

We've learned from wikipedia that

Contrary to popular belief, the Modular engine did not  get its name from  its design or sharing of certain parts among the  engine family.  Instead, the name was derived from a manufacturing plant protocol "Modular", where the plant and its tooling could be changed  out in a  matter of hours to manufacture different versions of the  engine family.

The Modular engines are used in various Ford, Lincoln,  and Mercury vehicles. Modular engines used in Ford trucks were marketed  under the Triton name from 1997 2010 while the InTech name was used for a  time at Lincoln for vehicles equipped with DOHC versions of the  engines.


  The 4.6 L (4601 cc, 281 CID)[2] 90-degree V8 has been offered in  2-valve SOHC, 3-valve SOHC, and 4-valve DOHC versions.

The engines were  also offered with both aluminum and cast iron blocks, depending on  application.

 

The 4.6 L's bore and stroke are nearly square at 90.2 mm   (3.552 in) and 90 mm (3.543 in), respectively. Deck height for the 4.6   block is 227 mm (8.937 in) and connecting rod length is 150.7 mm (5.933   in) center to center, giving the 4.6 L a 1.67:1 rod to stroke ratio.

 Cylinder bore spacing measures 100 mm (3.937 in), which is common to all  members of the Modular engine family.

 

All Modular V8s, save for the new  5.0 L Coyote, utilize  the same firing order as the Ford 5.0 L HO and  351 CID V8s  (1-3-7-2-6-5-4-8).

 

 The 4.6 L engines have been assembled at  Romeo Engine  Plant, located in Romeo, MI, and at Windsor Engine Plant  and Essex  Engine Plant, both located in Windsor, Ontario.

 

1996 4.6 SOHC 215HP Mustang Engine

Throttle body: 65mm (2.559 inches)

Intake manifold: composite, cast No. F6ZE-CG

Cylinder heads: cast No. RF-F5AE-AE

Combustion chambers: 49.77cc

Valves: 1.752/1.339 inches

Rockers: roller type, w/1.80:1 ratio

Camshaft lift: .473/.473-inch lift

Compression ratio: 9.30:1

Pistons: hypereutectic w/.153-inch dish

1997 4.6 SOHC 215HP Mustang Engine

Throttle body: 65mm (2.559 inches)

Intake manifold: composite, cast No. F6ZE-CG

Cylinder heads: cast No. RF-F5AE-AE

Combustion chambers: 49.77cc

Valves: 1.752/1.339 inches

Rockers: roller type, w/1.80:1 ratio

Camshaft lift: .473/.473-inch lift

Compression ratio: 9.30:1

Pistons: hypereutectic w/.153-inch dish

1998 4.6 SOHC 225HP Mustang Engine

Throttle body: 65mm (2.559 inches)

Intake manifold: composite, cast No. F6ZE-CG

Cylinder heads: cast No. RF-F5AE-AE

Combustion chambers: 49.77cc

Valves: 1.752/1.339 inches

Rockers: roller type, w/1.80:1 ratio

Camshaft lift: .473/.473-inch lift

Compression ratio: 9.30:1

Pistons: hypereutectic w/.153-inch dish

1999 4.6 SOHC 260HP Mustang Engine

Throttle body: 66.8mm (2.630 inches)

Intake manifold: composite, cast No. XR3E-DC

Cylinder heads: cast No. RFXL3-CZOD

Combustion chambers: 42.40cc

Valves: 1.752/1.417 inches

Rockers: roller type, w/1.80:1 ratio

Camshaft lift: .505/.534-inch lift

Compression ratio: 9.30:1

Pistons: hypereutectic w/.188-inch dish

2000 4.6 SOHC 260HP Mustang Engine

Throttle body: 65mm (2.560 inches)

Intake manifold: composite, cast No. XR3E-DC

Cylinder heads: cast No. RFXL3-CZOD

Combustion chambers: 42.45cc

Valves: 1.752/1.417 inches

Rockers: roller type, w/1.81:1 ratio

Camshaft lift: .505/.534-inch lift

Compression ratio: 9.74:1

Pistons: hypereutectic w/.188-inch dish

2001 4.6 SOHC 260HP Mustang Engine

Throttle body: 65mm (2.560 inches)

Intake manifold: composite, cast No. 1L2E-DL

Cylinder heads: cast No. RF1L2E-6090-D22D (or D24D)

Combustion chambers: 42.45cc

Valves: 1.752/1.417 inches

Rockers: roller type, w/1.81:1 ratio

Camshaft lift: .505/.534-inch lift

Compression ratio: 9.74:1

Pistons: hypereutectic w/.145-inch dish

2001 4.6 SOHC 265HP Mustang Bullitt Engine

Throttle body: twin 57mm (twin 2.24-inch)

Intake manifold: cast aluminum, cast No. RF-2RE3-9A448-AA

Cylinder heads: cast No. RF1L2E-6090-D22D (or D24D)

Combustion chambers: 42.45cc

Valves: 1.752/1.417 inches

Rockers: roller type, w/1.81:1 ratio

Camshaft lift: .505/.534-inch lift

Compression ratio: 9.74:1

Pistons: hypereutectic w/.145-inch dish

**All engine specifications are taken from the NHRA classification guide, found on-line at NHRA.com

 

***update - we found some great information on the Sullivan Performance (including these diagrams below) - click on either of the images below to check out the Sullivan Performance website, as well as their info on the Ford Modulars.

 


And from  from Richard Rowe, we find that

Ford  dropped a bombshell on the domestic V-8 market when  it introduced the  Modular engine in 1991. The "mod" motor represented a  quantum leap ahead  of Ford's old Windsor standby; it became the most  technologically  advanced V-8 of its time.

Even as of 2010, the Mod motor remains a  revelation in  terms of engineering and sophistication. The relatively  small 4.6-liter  was this engine family's mainstay for nearly two  decades, with  horsepower potential rivaling almost any V-8 on Earth.



 

The following specs are from   eHow and wikipedia (links) for your information:

 

 

Please visit both of these sites for more complete information



 

4.6 L 2-valve

The first production Modular engine was the 4.6 L 2-valve SOHC V8 introduced in the 1991 Lincoln Town Car.

 

The 4.6 L 2V has been built at both Romeo Engine Plant and  Windsor Engine Plant, and the plants have different designs for main  bearings, heads (cam caps: interconnected cam "cages" vs individual caps  per cam journal), camshaft gears (bolt-on vs. press-on), valve covers  (11 bolts vs. 13 bolts), crankshaft (6 bolts vs. 8 bolts), and cross  bolt fasteners for main bearing caps

 

In 1999, the F-Series 5.4 L 2V and the Mustang 4.6 L 2V  received upgrades which included cylinder heads with improved port and  combustion chamber designs, a more aggressive cam profile, and improved  intake manifolds. This upgrade was known as the PI (Performance  Improved) package.

 

In 2001, the F150 and Crown Victoria 4.6 Ls received the  PI package. In keeping with traditional Ford practice, as engine design  is revised over time and compatibility with previous versions is  considered low priority,so that parts from a Modular engine made in one  model year are not necessarily likely to fit an engine made in another;  and parts from an engine manufactured in Romeo are unlikely to fit an  engine made in Windsor.

 The single overhead camshaft (SOHC) two-valve (2V)  cylinder head, designed to replace the 302 Windsor in passenger car  applications, tops off the base 4.6-liter configuration.

The Romeo, Michigan, plant (the only plant producing Mod  motors from 1991 to 1995) originally produced the SOHC 2V engine as a  passenger car engine.

Ford's Windsor, Ontario, plant produced an entirely  different (but similar-looking) 4.6-liter modular engine intended  primarily for trucks.

 

The cam-cover bolts provide one of the few clues to the  engine's origin: Romeo cam covers have 11 bolts, while Windsor covers  have 13.

The  2V engine originally produced 190 horsepower and 270 foot-pounds of  torque, growing to 210 hp, 215 hp, 235 hp, 239 hp (as used in most 1998  through 2005 trucks) and finally 260 hp for the 1999 through 2004  Mustang.

Vehicles equipped with the 16-valve SOHC 4.6 L include the following:

1991-1993 Lincoln Town Car, 190 hp (142 kW) and 270 lb ·ft (366 N ·m)
 1992-1997 Ford Crown Victoria/Mercury Grand Marquis, 210 hp (157 kW) and 270 lb ·ft (366 N ·m) with dual exhaust option
 1998-2000 Ford Crown Victoria/Mercury Grand Marquis, 215 hp (160 kW) and 285 lb ·ft (386 N ·m) with dual exhaust option
 2001-2002 Ford Crown Victoria/Mercury Grand Marquis, 235 hp (175 kW) and 275 lb ·ft (373 N ·m) with dual exhaust option
 2003-2012 Ford Crown Victoria/Mercury Grand Marquis, 239 hp (178 kW) and 282 lb ·ft (382 N ·m) with dual exhaust option
 2004-2011 Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor, 250 hp (186 kW) and 297 lb ·ft (403 N ·m)
 1994-1997 Lincoln Town Car, 210 hp (157 kW)
 1994-1995 Ford Thunderbird, 205 hp (153 kW) and 265 lb ·ft (359 N ·m)
 1996-1997 Ford Thunderbird, 215 hp (160 kW) and 280 lb ·ft (380 N ·m)
 1994-1995 Mercury Cougar, 205 hp (153 kW) and 265 lb ·ft (359 N ·m)
 1996-1997 Mercury Cougar, 215 hp (160 kW) and 280 lb ·ft (380 N ·m)
 1997-2010 Ford F-Series, 248 hp (185 kW) and 294 lb ·ft (399 N ·m) ratings for 2007 and later model year F-Series
 1997-present Ford E-Series, 225 hp (168 kW) and 286 lb ·ft (388 N ·m) ratings for 2001 and later model year E-Series
 1998-2000 Lincoln Town Car, 205 hp (153 kW)
 2001-2002 Lincoln Town Car, 235 hp (175 kW)
 2003-2011 Lincoln Town Car, 239 hp (178 kW)
 2002-2005 Ford Explorer, 239 hp (178 kW) and 282 lb ·ft (382 N ·m)
 1996-1997 Ford Mustang, 215 hp (160 kW) and 285 lb ·ft (386 N ·m)
 1998 Ford Mustang, 225 hp (168 kW) and 290 lb ·ft (393 N ·m)
 1999-2004 Ford Mustang, 260 hp (194 kW) and 302 lb ·ft (409 N ·m)
 2003-2005 Rover 75, 260 hp (194 kW) and 302 lb ·ft (409 N ·m)
 2003-2005 MG ZT, 260 hp (194 kW) and 302 lb ·ft (409 N ·m)

3-valve

 

While reducing valve count by  one and cam count by two may seem  retrograde, as a whole the more modern  three-valve engine is superior  to the four-valve in almost every  respect.

While the stock cylinder head intake port flow drops to about   223 cfm at 0.500-inch lift, flow generally remains higher than the 4V at   lower lifts. Ford used both variable cam timing and a new charge  motion  control valve (CMCV) --- conceptually similar to the IMRC used  on 4V  engines --- to increase performance and make the most of the new  head  design.

Aluminum-block car engines vary between 300 (2005 through 2009  Mustang) and 315 horsepower (2010 Mustang); iron-block truck engines  produce 292 horsepower.

4.6 L 3-valve SOHC V8 installed in a 2006 Ford Mustang GT

 

The 3-valve SOHC 4.6 L with variable camshaft timing (VCT) first appeared in the redesigned 2005 Ford Mustang.

 

The engines are equipped with an electronic Charge Motion  Control Valve (CMCV) system that provides increased air velocity at low  engine speeds for improved emissions and low-rpm torque.

 

Cylinder block material varies between aluminum used in  the 2005+ Mustang GT and cast iron used in the 2006+ Ford Explorer and  the 2007+ Ford Explorer Sport Trac (see below), though the same aluminum  heads are used in all applications.

 

The 3-valve SOHC 4.6 L engine was on the Ward's 10 Best Engines list for 2005-2008.


 

Vehicles equipped with the 24-valve SOHC VCT 4.6 L include the following:

2005-2009 Ford Mustang, 300 hp (224 kW) and 320 lb ·ft (433 N/·m)
 2006-2010 Ford Explorer, 292 hp (218 kW) and 315 lb ·ft (427 N/·m)
 2007-2010 Ford Explorer Sport Trac, 292 hp (218 kW) and 315 lb ·ft (427 N/·m)
 2009-2010 Ford F-Series, 292 hp (218 kW) and 320 lb ·ft (433 N/·m)
 2010 Ford Mustang, 315 hp (235 kW) and 325 lb ·ft (440 N/·m)



 

4-valve

 

The dual overhead cam (DOHC) four-valve (4V) engine, the   higher-performance variant of the already high-performing 4.6-liter,   remains the darling of Mustang racers everywhere.

The 4V engine had  significantly higher-flowing cylinder heads  --- about 240 cubic feet per  minute (cfm) of air at 0.500-inch lift ---  versus the 2V (156 cfm at  0.500-inch lift), giving far higher  horsepower potential than its lesser  sibling.

 

The 4V engine also used a stronger aluminum engine block cast  by  the Italy-based Teksid Group, and many used forged crankshafts,  forged  pistons and stronger connecting rods capable of handling massive   horsepower.

 

 Engines from the 1993 through 1998 model years used intake   manifold runner control (IMRC) valves to close one intake port at low   revolutions per minute (rpm); later engines used the more efficient   tumble-port design that used a single, large intake port that split into   two valves. All 2003 through 2004 SVT Cobras used a four-bolt main  iron  block instead of the standard six-bolt (cross-bolted) main  aluminum  block.

 

Horsepower ratings, which varied by model and year, included 260   horsepower (1995 through 1997 Lincoln Continental), 280 horsepower  (1993  through 1998 Lincoln MkIII), 305 horsepower (1996 through 1998  Mustang  SVT Cobra) and 390 horsepower for the supercharged, iron-block  2003  through 2004 Cobra.

 

4.6 L 4-valve DOHC InTech V8 installed in a 1996 Lincoln Mark VIII


  4.6 L 4-valve DOHC supercharged V8 installed in a 2003 Ford Mustang SVT Cobra

The 4-valve DOHC version of the Modular engine was  introduced in the 1993 Lincoln Mark VIII as the 4.6 L Four-Cam V8.  Lincoln marketed the engine under the name InTech after 1995.

 

The 1993-1998 4-valve engines featured cylinder heads  with two intake ports per cylinder (split-port) and variable runner  length intake manifolds with either vacuum or electrically activated  intake manifold runner controls (IMRC) depending on application.

The engine was revised for 1999 with new cylinder heads  featuring tumble-style intake ports (one intake port feeding two intake  valves), new camshaft profiles, and fixed runner-length intake  manifolds. These changes resulted in more power, torque and a broader  power-band when compared to the earlier 4-valve engines.

 

All 4.6 L 4-valve engines featured aluminum engine blocks  with 6-bolt main bearing caps, the only exception being the 2003 2004  SVT Cobra which had a 4-bolt main cast iron block.

The 1999 and earlier engines featured an aluminum block  cast in Italy by Fiat subsidiary Teksid S.p.A. Since 1996, all of the  4.6 L 4-valve engines manufactured for use in the SVT Cobra have been  hand-built by SVT technicians at Ford's Romeo, Michigan plant.

The 4-valve DOHC 4.6 L engine was on the Ward's 10 Best Engines list for 1996 and 1997.


 

Vehicles equipped with the 32-valve DOHC 4.6 L include the following:

1993-1998 Lincoln Mark VIII, 280 hp (209 kW) and 285 lb/·ft (386 N/·m)
 1995-1998 Lincoln Continental, 260 hp (194 kW) and 265 lb/·ft (359 N/·m)
 1996-1998 Ford Mustang SVT Cobra, 305 hp (227 kW) and 300 lb/·ft (407 N/·m)
 1997-1999 Panoz AIV Roadster, 305 hp (227 kW) and 300 lb-ft (407 N-m)
 1995-1998 Lincoln Mark VIII LSC, 290 hp (216 kW) and 295 lb/·ft (400 N/·m)
 1997-1999 Marcos Mantis GT, 320 hp (239 kW) and 317 lb/·ft (430 N/·m)
 1999-2002 Lincoln Continental, 275 hp (205 kW) and 275 lb/·ft (373 N/·m)
 1999/2001 Ford Mustang SVT Cobra, 320 hp (239 kW) and 317 lb/·ft (430 N/·m)
 2000-2001 Qvale Mangusta, 320 hp (239 kW) and 317 lb/·ft (430 N/·m)
 2003-2005 MG X-Power SV, 320 hp (239 kW) and 317 lb/·ft (430 N/·m)
 2000-2008 Panoz Esperante, 320 hp (239 kW) and 320 lb/·ft (434 N/·m)
 2003 Ford Mustang Mach 1, 305 hp (227 kW) and 320 lb/·ft (434 N/·m)
 2004 Ford Mustang Mach 1, 310 hp (231 kW) and 335 lb/·ft (454 N/·m)
 2003-2004 Mercury Marauder, 302 hp (225 kW) and 318 lb/·ft (431 N/·m)
 2003-2005 Lincoln Aviator, 302 hp (225 kW) and 318 lb/·ft (431 N/·m)
 2003-2004 Ford Mustang SVT Cobra, Iron block, Supercharged, 390 hp (291 kW) and 390 lb/·ft (529 N/·m)

 

The eHow portion was written by Richard Rowe

Richard Rowe has been writing professionally since 2007, specializing  in  mechanical theory and automotive topic areas. He's worked as a   tractor-trailer driver and mechanic, a rigger at a fire engine factory,   as well as a race-car driver and builder. Rowe studied engineering,   philosophy and American literature at Central Florida Community College   and describes himself as a sort of mechanical anthropologist. While his   work is generally quite technical in nature, he's known for his  frequent  use of humor and historical perspective.  Find more of his writing here(link)  

***update: found some great info on F150hub.com, including these specs:

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